Student guest post: How to navigate the crucial writer-editor relationship

Students in MEJO 557, Advanced Editing, are writing guest posts for this site this semester. This is the seventh of those posts. Adam Phan is a UNC-Chapel Hill student studying journalism with a minor in art history. He is an assistant Arts & Entertainment editor at The Daily Tar Heel and hopes to write for Entertainment Weekly magazine one day.

I haven’t been working at The Daily Tar Heel for too long. In fact, I only joined the student publication this past spring. I was a newly minted staff writer with no journalism experience.

Fast-forward to a year later: I’m now an assistant Arts & Entertainment editor at the paper. Instead of doing the writing, I’m now doing the editing. Oh, how the tables have turned. In addition to editing, I’m responsible for other things like assigning stories and attending budget meetings.

Wait, that’s all? No, not really.

My most important duty as an editor is maintaining a good relationship with my writers. If you’re on shaky ground with them, they might not be putting out their best work. After a semester of being an assistant editor, I’ve picked up a few tips on how to navigate the crucial relationship between a writer and an editor.

1. Get to know your writer.

I remember coming into the office to read my first story — a review of the CW drama “Riverdale.” I barely knew my editors, so I was sort of shy. But that quickly changed because they made an effort to get to know me.

With that said, get to know your writers. I’m managing a staff of 25 writers. Yes, it may seem like a lot of people to get to know, but it’s the first step in maintaining a good relationship with them. By learning their names and a few facts about them, they’ll begin to feel more comfortable around you. It’ll break the awkward silence and tension that can happen while you’re editing their stories. And trust me, I’ve been there before, and it is not fun.

When a writer comes in, I make it a habit to ask them how their week has been so far. Ask if they have anything important or exciting coming up and go from there. Crack some jokes with them. Let them know you’re looking out for them and that you care about their development. And help them if they ever need anything, like advice on homework or someone to talk to during some tough times. You’re their friend, and they’re yours.

2. Communicate often with your writers.

Communication is very important in a writer-editor relationship. It can make or break the story.

Sometimes writers may have some trouble finding or contacting sources, or they’re struggling with the lede or structure of a story. Your job as an editor is to help them. So I give out my phone number to my writers so they can message me anytime with their questions. They can email me, too, but I respond much faster to text messages since I have my phone on me at all times.

But remember, communication is a two-way street. If they don’t reach out to you, you need to reach out to them. Make sure they’re held accountable for updates and deadlines. It’s crucial to know where they are with their stories. You don’t want to them waiting to the last minute to contact their sources to write their story.

To keep them accountable at all times, the Arts & Entertainment desk has a Google Sheets spreadsheet where our writers can update us on their stories. We encourage them to fill it out each day. On the day of their deadline, they must update the document by 2:30 p.m., or we’ll text them inquiring about their story.

3. Respect your writers.

Your job as an editor is to edit your writers’ stories. But that doesn’t mean you can go off on a power trip. You may be in a position of power over them, but they are still your equal, so treat them the way you would want to be treated if you were a writer. Don’t talk down to them when they make a mistake. Your job is to help them grow as a writer. After all, the DTH is a learning newspaper.

Just like communication, editing is a two-way street. Be sure to always edit side-by-side with the writer. Engage them in the editing process. If you come across something strange while editing their stories, ask questions. For example, “Why did you phrase it this way?” Don’t just automatically change something.

Writers can get defensive about changes at first, so by asking questions, you can come to understand their reasoning behind it. And you may not change something because of it. However, if you still think something should be changed, be sure to have a good reason for it, too.

Also, don’t forget to compliment them on their good work. Give them credit where it’s due, and you’ll have a happy writer. And a happy writer means you’re a good editor.

Advertisements

Student guest post: The Daily Tar Heel celebrates 125 years, but it needs your help for 125 more

dth-line

PEOPLE LINE UP TO BUY EXTRA COPIES OF THE DAILY TAR HEEL A DAY AFTER THE MEN’S BASKETBALL TEAM WON THE NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP IN APRIL 2017. (PHOTO COURTESY OF JOCK LAUTERER)

Students in MEJO 557, Advanced Editing, are writing guest posts for this site this semester. This is the sixth of those posts. Ana Irizarry is a senior studying journalism and political science. She is the state and national news editor at The Daily Tar Heel, a reporter for N.C. Business News Wire and previously interned for The Herald-Sun in Durham.

The Daily Tar Heel, UNC-Chapel Hill’s independent, student-run newspaper, will turn 125 years old on Friday, Feb. 23.

The DTH’s 125th Anniversary Conference and Gala, which takes place Feb. 23-25, will celebrate over a century of independent student journalism. The weekend will involve panels and speakers discussing the past and future of journalism and The Daily Tar Heel.

Alongside celebrations, the newspaper and its student journalists will (hopefully) raise money to fund the continuation of the paper’s mission to “aggressively pursue all news of the University, University community and all who are affected by the University.”

It’s no secret the DTH has struggled financially since 2011. The paper’s former general manager, Betsy O’Donovan, wrote a post for Medium about the situation, and The Poynter Institute reported on it.

At the beginning of the 2016-17 school year, the paper was operating on a deficit of more than $300,000. By the end of the year, O’Donovan helped cut the paper’s debt to less than $30,000 — mostly thanks to the sale of over 50,000 papers after UNC’s men’s basketball team won the NCAA national championship.

The paper will relocate from its East Rosemary Street location to a smaller office across the street to help save money. The development of The 1893 Brand Studio and Friends of The Daily Tar Heel have also helped raise money for the nonprofit.

I started working at The Daily Tar Heel the second semester of my sophomore year.

I had no idea what I was doing.

Looking back, my first assignment covering a news conference about textbook funding seems minuscule. I could write that story in my sleep if I had to today. But in January 2016, the task seemed monumental.

That first story was a crash course in AP style, interviewing and deadline writing. As the weeks went on, my articles were cleaner, and I got faster at writing.

The semester I started at The Daily Tar Heel was also the semester I took my first news writing class, and as much as I loved that class and as much as I learned from my instructor, it didn’t compare to the education I got from my real-world experience.

Now as an editor for the paper, I know more about the journalism side — although I can always learn more — but I don’t know much about the business side.

Last school year, The Daily Tar Heel held “money talks” every Friday to go over the paper’s financial situation. At the beginning of the 2017-18 school year, the paper’s new editors were informed on the situation. While we can brainstorm strategies to improve our finances, we need help from our community.

We need to hear what works, what doesn’t and what the community needs from us.

The rise of the internet spurred the decline of print journalism — and student journalism was no exception. U.S. newspaper advertisement revenue peaked in 2005 at over $49.4 billion, according to data collected by the Pew Research Center. Newspapers collected an estimated $18.3 billion from advertising in 2016 — a 69 percent plummet in 11 years. Independent college newspapers like The Daily Tar Heel and George Washington University’s The Hatchet are facing similar realities.

Even university-funded newspapers are under threat: Many fear funding cuts and censorship, such as the University of Louisville’s The Louisville Cardinal and Wesleyan University’s The Argus.

The numbers seem dismal, but I believe in the role The Daily Tar Heel plays in the university and in the Chapel Hill community. Serving as not only the university’s paper, The Daily Tar Heel acts as the paper of record for Chapel Hill. It has reported local elections, Town Council meetings and local housing. It also educates future journalists like me.

If you’d like to celebrate The Daily Tar Heel’s 125th anniversary and have it run 125 more years, consider donating here.

Q&A with Kevin Schaefer, columnist and editor at SMA News Today

kevin-schaefer

Kevin Schaefer is a writer and community editor at SMA News Today, a website about the genetic disease spinal muscular atrophy. He lives in Cary, North Carolina, and is a graduate of N.C. State University. In this interview, conducted by email, Schaefer discusses his work at SMA News Today and offers advice on how others with SMA can explore careers in writing.

Q. Describe your job at SMA News Today. What is your typical workweek like?

A. I started working for SMA News Today a few months ago writing a weekly column. Recently I started full-time as a community editor. In addition to writing my column, I also write and edit content for our news section.

Our news page is divided into two main sections. There’s the research side, which covers all of the latest research news within the SMA community and information about clinical trials, and those articles are written by people with scientific backgrounds who have direct access to the literature. The other component is our social clips section, which I’m now helping oversee. This is where we post articles about managing life with SMA and also do profiles on SMA individuals.

Some of the articles I just wrote for this section include: “5 Tips for Going To School When You Have SMA” and “5 Tips for Supporting a Friend or Family Member with SMA.” My executive editor and my publisher really wanted a patient specialist like me to provide feedback on this content and take a more active role in producing content from here on.

That said, my day-to-day work kind of varies depending on what tasks I have to do. At the beginning of the week, I chat with my editors and our social media team to brainstorm ideas and decide which articles we’re going to run on our social media pages. Then if I’m not reviewing other posts, I’m usually writing.

So far I’ve been writing a couple social clips articles per week, and then I write my column on Thursdays. I also record weekly audio flash briefings of previously published content. These are basically mini-podcasts that anyone with an Echo device from Amazon Alexa can access. I just read an excerpt from one of my articles from that week and do an audio recording.

My next project is to produce a monthly podcast in which I’ll interview various people with SMA. I just scheduled my first interview, and I am working to get that first episode live on our site by the end of the month. So it’s a very multimedia job that requires me to use all of my journalism and communication skills.

Q. How do editing and headline writing work at SMA News Today?

A. SMA News Today is one of multiple websites that are owned by a parent company called BioNews. Each of these websites provides daily digital coverage of a specific neuromuscular condition.

BioNews has a vast network of employees from all around the world. I live in North Carolina and work from home, my main editors live in Texas, another lives in Canada, etc. As such, all of our communication is done digitally. We use an app called Slack, which despite the name is basically a professional version of GroupMe. We use it constantly to share ideas, ask each other questions and conduct conference calls.

So when I post one of my columns, I save it as a draft so my editors can look it over and make the necessary changes. I’ll post a placeholder headline which they usually like, but if they come up with something better, then they’ll change it.

Most of the editing so far has been of previously published content. One of my first tasks when I started this new role was to go through all of the old articles in the social clips section and provide feedback. Here I did change a few headlines and make some other suggestions for specific articles, and I just had a conference call last week with my team in which I shared my thoughts on this section as it is and also pitched ideas for future content. It went great, and I’m excited for the ideas we came up with together. All that said, every post is a collaborative effort, and we go through an extensive editorial process just like any other professional publication.

Q. What is your assessment of how news organizations cover SMA in general? How could they improve?

A. You know, there was a tragic story last year about a teenage girl who had a severe case of SMA and who made the decision to get rid of all life support. She died a few weeks later, and every media outlet was all over this story like a pack of wolves. Every one of them competed to produce the most heart-wrenching account of a story that was so grounded in ethical controversy. The message they all sent, however, was that SMA is nothing more than a terrifying disease, and that everyone with it is better off dead.

Yeah SMA is terrifying and difficult, but so many of us who live with it are living great lives and not letting it stop us. We also now have the FDA-approved treatment Spinraza, as well as an abundance of support within the SMA community. I was pretty enraged by the sheer laziness of these journalists who all took the same watered-down approach to this story, and I wrote about it in my school newspaper while I was still in college.

It’s getting better, but a lot of times the mainstream media either portrays people with disabilities as helpless objects of pity or as angels who are only here to inspire the rest of the world. We’re just people who have different challenges and obstacles than someone who is able-bodied.

In terms of good media examples, I’ve enjoyed reading The New York Times section on disability. This is a weekly series of essays by disabled authors, and I know of at least one SMA writer who has contributed to it. The last one I read was by a woman who wrote about online dating when you’re in a wheelchair, which I found really insightful. I also love watching the ABC sitcom “Speechless” with my parents, which does a great job juxtaposing humor with its more sentimental aspects.

In terms of what makes SMA News Today and BioNews stand out is that we’re the only publication producing daily coverage of SMA. The organization Cure SMA, which I’m also involved with, does post news stories, but their primary focus is raising money for research. SMA News Today posts both news articles and a wide range of columns. Including me we have four columnists right now, and we each bring something different to the table.

It’s pretty surreal working for this site. I always figured that if something like SMA News Today existed, I’d have to be the one to start it. Thankfully, that’s not the case! I love the job I have, but I could never handle the pressure or skill level of a CEO or publisher. Mike and Chris (my executive editor and publisher) have done a fantastic job building the company from the ground up, and I’m happy to be a part of it now.

Q. What advice do you have for other people with SMA who are considering careers in writing?

I encourage anyone who has SMA and who has an interest in writing to pursue it. The great thing about it is that you can do it from anywhere, and despite what people tell you, it can lead to a paying job eventually. You just have to stick with it and figure out what kind of writing you’re good at.

For me, I was a theater kid growing up, and my high school drama teachers noticed I had a knack for writing when I scripted monologues for my peers to perform. I tried my hand at writing longer plays and prose fiction, but it was always too amateur. Still, my parents and all my teachers were supportive, and I remember my creative writing teacher at the time observing how I’d always have a graphic novel on me every time she saw me. It’s fitting that I’ve now written several comic book scripts and am trying to break into the industry.

Then in college I majored in English hoping to become a screenwriter, and I kind of stumbled into journalism on a whim. Although my parents were both journalism majors in college and have years of experience working for newspapers, I went into N.C. State’s student newspaper office without an ounce of knowledge about reporting. I’m pretty sure I even spelled a source’s name incorrectly in my first article. I came in just wanting to write movie reviews, and I ended up staying there throughout my college career and even being the features co-editor my junior year.

I definitely wouldn’t have this job if it weren’t for my time at the Technician, and it was there that I wrote my first columns about my disability. Though I mainly wrote for the Arts & Entertainment section, my articles about how people with disabilities are portrayed in the media were some of my most well-received. The same thing happened when I tackled the subject in my fiction-writing classes. I realized how much I had to say about life with SMA and that I could convey my perspective through a blend of humor and serious essays. That’s basically the foundation of my column “Embracing My Inner Alien.”

So that’s how I got to this point, but there’s no secret formula. If you’re an SMA individual who wants to write, then start writing now and read every book you can. You don’t have to become an English major, but I do strongly recommend some form of higher education.

All it boils down to is your willingness to put forth the effort and getting your work out there. Start your own blog. Write a book or a screenplay. We need our voices heard and our stories told, and in this day and age it’s easier than ever before to build an audience. You can start your own blog for free or submit articles to different publications and acquire freelance work that way.

Heck, I’ve even done stand-up comedy a couple of times, and I’m now working on several comic book projects with some artist friends of mine. There aren’t many limits you have in terms of what you can do as a writer, and the term “writer’s block” is nothing more than a BS excuse to be lazy.

I’m far from a perfect example of an ultra-disciplined writer, but if I go a day without writing at least a page of something or an article, I feel guilty. If I’m ever feeling complacent with my writing output, I look at heroes of mine like Neil Gaiman and Scott Snyder and get back to work.

Follow Kevin Schaefer on Twitter and read his posts at SMA News Today.

Student guest post: A first-hand look at a championship win in a student newsroom

dth-police

Staff members of The Daily Tar Heel hand out copies of the newspaper the day after UNC won the national championship in men’s basketball.

Students in MEJO 457, Advanced Editing, are writing guest posts for this blog this semester. This is the 11th of those posts. Hannah Smoot is a senior journalism major at UNC-Chapel Hill. She spends most of her waking hours working at The Daily Tar Heel.

On April 3, UNC won the NCAA national championship in men’s basketball. As a senior at UNC, this was a dream come true. As managing editor of The Daily Tar Heel, UNC’s independent, student-run newspaper, my feelings were a little more complicated.

More than anything, I was excited — this year, The Daily Tar Heel stopped producing a print newspaper on Tuesdays, but we had a special edition championship edition in the works.

Part of me was apprehensive at the same time. While we’re used to putting together a print paper every day, this would be an especially taxing night.

In preparation, we moved our print deadline to 2:30 a.m. — and missed it by about an hour. We were stuck waiting on writers in Phoenix (the site of the Final Four) to find Wi-Fi and send in their stories. In this situation, we had to figure out how editors can effectively communicate with writers and hold writers to a deadline.

Before we sent writers to Phoenix, we sat down and asked them what a reasonable deadline would be. We talked about how long it would take them to check stats, interview players and finish writing, and then brought that deadline to our printers and worked out a deadline.

Of course, the night of the game, this deadline was much harder to hold our writers to. Holding writers to a deadline can be difficult enough when they’re in the same room as you — but we realized just how hard it could be when they’re not even in the same state.

While we missed our deadline, we were able to get the pages to the printer in time to start handing out papers at 7 a.m. This was in part because we were firm with the writers — and made sure they knew why the deadline needed to be followed as closely as possible. Communication is always important, but in this case, over-communicating our needs with the writers was critical to printing a paper at all.

When we finally got the stories, we sped-read the stories, checking for accuracy in record speed. We went to bed, woke up at 7 a.m. and started handing out papers.

In all, I got about one hour of sleep and worked over 30 hours almost nonstop in two days. While it was one of the most exhausting days I’ve had at the DTH, working for a student newspaper during the NCAA championship was an incredible experience unlike any other Franklin Street rush.

How a college newspaper won the national championship

dth-line

People line up to buy extra copies of The Daily Tar Heel a day after the men’s basketball team won the national championship. (Photo courtesy of Jock Lauterer)

Like many college publications, The Daily Tar Heel is free and distributed via newsracks placed across campus and in downtown Chapel Hill. That makes it easy to pick up a copy on the way to class.

But that system broke down one day in 2009. The men’s basketball team won the national championship, and people grabbed more than one copy of the DTH from newsracks. Some snatched dozens and sold them on eBay. A lot of people missed a chance to get a souvenir of UNC’s victory, and the DTH missed a chance to make some money.

This week, UNC did it again, defeating Gonzaga to win the NCAA Tournament. But this time, the DTH changed the way it distributed this keepsake edition of the newspaper.

To do that, DTH staffers handed out newspapers at various locations on campus — one copy per person. If a person asked for more than one copy, the staff member told them that extras were available at the DTH office for $1 each.

“We wanted to ensure that everyone in the community got their one free copy and avoid people getting 50 copies,” said Erica Perel, the newspaper’s adviser.

The plan worked. Basketball fans got souvenirs. The DTH gave away or sold more than 50,000 papers compared with 10,000 on a typical day. That’s significant for a news organization that has struggled financially in recent years.

So, congrats to both groups of Tar Heels — the men’s basketball team and the student journalists. You both won big.

Student guest post: How to build a better in-house style guide

Students in MEJO 457, Advanced Editing, are writing guest posts for this blog this semester. This is the sixth of those posts. Alison Krug is a senior at UNC-Chapel Hill. She is the managing editor and copy editor of Southern Neighbor magazine and the newsroom director and former copy chief at The Daily Tar Heel.

Last fall, I embarked on an independent study focusing on the construction of style guides. For my final project, I spent the semester rebuilding the in-house style guides for The Daily Tar Heel and Southern Neighbor magazine.

The DTH is an independent, student-run paper at UNC-Chapel Hill that publishes in print four days a week and online every day. Southern Neighbor is an independent, student-run monthly magazine that focuses on business, arts and education around Orange County, North Carolina. Both operate under DTH Media Corp.

Both publications had existing guides that were in disarray, so I conducted interviews with copy editors at publications including The Technician (N.C. State University’s student paper), BuzzFeed and the Washington Post to get an idea of what makes an effective style guide.

By the end of the semester, I had two fresh in-house style guides.

Here’s what I learned are the steps you need to take when constructing an in-house style guide:

1. Read the (news)room.

Before I touched a single style entry, I conducted a few informal interviews with DTH editors and staffers to find out what difficulties they had with the stylebook. Based on these interviews and my experience as copy chief, I could assess which aspects of the stylebook were the most urgent and crucial to fix.

I discovered that the DTH staff wanted a new way to host the stylebook (the Google Doc it lived on was a mess) that was easy to share with staffers and didn’t involve logging in to anything.

It sounds simple, but after logging 80 pages of style entries for the DTH guide, I wouldn’t want to distribute it to the newsroom only to then find out I had to make some huge structural or content change to suit the staff’s needs.

2. Find an in-house balance.

The old DTH and Southern Neighbor style guides were gummed up with sections reiterating AP style rules over and over again. Both Southern Neighbor and the DTH use AP style and then use in-house guides to make additions to or overwrite the AP.

I realized about halfway through my construction of the new guides that I was not being consistent in my decisions to scrap or keep an AP style entry. I decided that because each DTH desk has an AP stylebook account, I wouldn’t copy AP entries unless they were a style point the newsroom often struggled with.

3. Find your structure.

The best advice I have for figuring out formatting is to cherry-pick from existing guides.

For the DTH and Southern Neighbor, I based my format heavily off of the 2008 DTH style guide. I began with a mission statement (the DTH prides itself to be a teaching paper, so the mission statement’s main purpose is to guide new copy desk staffers as they make editing choices), a quick rundown of AP basics, an A to Z of style points and then a collection of topic-specific mini style sheets (the 2008 DTH guide did something similar with mini style sheets, but I refined the format based on BuzzFeed’s meticulously organized guide).

Here are some helpful questions to ask yourself when deciding on structure:

Who will be using the guide?

For the DTH, it would be a newsroom of over 200, including about 30 copy editors — many who would be brand new to journalism. This led me to make sure my AP basics section and how-to-copy-edit mission statement in the most visible spot on the first page. For Southern Neighbor, there’s often just one copy chief who is very familiar with the ins and outs of the publication, so a how-to-edit guide was not as crucial to prominently display.

What medium will the final guide be in?

Will it be printed? A Word file? I knew both guides I was creating would have an online home, so I put emphasis on making sure subheads for sections and individual entries could be found through a cmd+f search for keywords.

Where can I look for inspiration?

I found the guides of news organizations that shared the same news values or had the same copy desk difficulties to be the most helpful. If you’re writing an in-house guide for a college publication, get in contact with another college copy editor. You’ll probably find you’re facing similar problems, and it’s fun to talk to someone who works the same horrific hours as you.

4. Get input.

My preferred method of getting feedback was emailing iterations of the guides out to editors and begging for their input. A Google Form or JotForm might work better for you.

5. Be ready to be flexible.

All of my points listed above could be distilled to one takeaway: Do the groundwork beforehand so you don’t have to make major changes once you’re 50 pages into your guide.

But it’s a copy desk: Things happen. It’s good to have a plan to anticipate changes to the guide.

The N.C. State University student newspaper meets once a year to discuss style changes. A style summit like this might work for college papers and smaller newsrooms (like the DTH), while a larger operation or a publication where contributors don’t come in to an office (like Southern Neighbor) might benefit from a Google form or some other online submission form paired with a regular email on style updates from the copy desk.

Q&A with Ellen Meder, editorial adviser at N.C. State University

Technician, the student newspaper at N.C. State University, recently switched to a tabloid format and reduced its printing schedule to two days a week.

Technician, the student newspaper at N.C. State University, recently switched to a tabloid format and reduced its printing schedule to two days a week.

Ellen Meder is editorial adviser for student media at N.C. State University, a position she has held since 2014. An alumna of the University of South Carolina, she previously worked as a multimedia journalist at TV station WSPA and at The Morning News in Florence, South Carolina. In this interview, conducted by email, Meder discusses her role at N.C. State and changes at Technician, a campus newspaper.

Q. Describe your job. What is your typical day like?

A. The main goal of my job is to teach, train and advise the students who run N.C. State’s two student newspapers, Technician and Nubian Message. Basically, I use my professional experience and perspective to help them do what they do better.

It’s nice that a “typical” day doesn’t always look the same, but I’m usually juggling creating or leading training sessions on reporting or editing, holding critique sessions with newer writers, marking up the latest issues with constructive criticism and doling out advice for the papers’ senior staff on everything from management styles to good design.

Another role is helping writers and editors strategize on how to pursue difficult reporting — which is often one part coach, one part gumshoe and one part paralegal — but that has to be one of the best parts; seeing students’ curiosity get sparked and realize that they actually can track down the truth. Sometimes paperwork wrangling and departmental reports sneak in there, too, unfortunately.

Q. Technician will reduce its publication schedule in print to two days a week. What is the reason for this change, and what else is ahead for the newspaper?

A. We are definitely viewing the change as a shift of how and where content is produced, not as an overall reduction. It was a tough decision and one our professional staff and students didn’t take lightly.

We took the idea to this year’s editor-in-chief when we realized that a change in the print production schedule could bolster some of her goals, including pushing toward a more web-first mentality and really shaking things up with multimedia content and design, and our departmental goals, like increasing student pay for our leaders as to take down a barrier to diversity and stanch the flow of talented students who couldn’t afford not to have better paid, low skill jobs.

So those are the primary reasons for the decision being made now: It will lend more in the budget for payroll, and it will give the team time and space to focus more on their online output, instead of grinding so hard on each print edition that they’re too burnt out to think of producing anything until 5 p.m. the following day.

But it’s not something that had to happen right this second. Decreased advertising revenues would have eventually forced a reduction, though. We saw the writing on the wall with other universities and our own budget trends and decided that we’d rather make the move when our backs aren’t yet against the wall, when we can control it, and when we can advance other goals.

As far as what’s next, Rachel Smith, the editor-in-chief, has some great goals, and we’ll all be working toward making this transition smooth and ultimately more useful for readers. That means restructuring the newsroom work flow to get news online accurately and quickly (not the other way around) via the website, mobile, the app and social media.

Technician definitely wants to meet readers where they are, and that’s frequently on their phones. The students also want to produce more graphics for web and continue beefing up their video department.

The push to web means that the balance of content will likely shift in the print editions, since no one wants to put 24-hour old news on stands to sit for three days. It’s also transitioning to a modified tab format, so they’re trying new things with design and more engaging covers that don’t look the exact same each day. It’s definitely an exciting time!

Q. How did you get involved with student media, and what do you like most about the job?

A. I loved student media in college, and The Daily Gamecock newsroom was my second home. After I graduated, I worked as a reporter in TV and then at a newspaper in South Carolina for a few years before I started looking around for a new challenge.

I grew up in Raleigh, and when I found the listing for this position, I was super excited and, during the interview, very nervous because I wanted it so badly. I had contemplated going to graduate school for higher education administration when I was scared I’d never get a job in news, but this position meshed my love of journalism and helping college students grow into awesome, productive adults as so many staffers at USC had done for me.

The best part of the job is hands down the students. Watching them learn and grow is exciting and they are hilarious, smart, ambitious and excited. There isn’t the same pall of a declining industry in a student newsroom, nor the jaded curmudgeonliness that was starting to tint my outlook at a small-town paper.

Plus, they are downright challenging. Each student and each group is different, so I have to adapt my teaching and communication styles to best serve them and help them do what they do better. Sometimes that goes great! Sometimes it’s more frustrating, and I have to keep adapting. But when they get it, when they publish a damn good paper, uncover something important or cover a difficult topic with sensitivity, grace and attention to detail, there is nothing better.

Q. What advice do you have for college students considering working for campus publications?

A. Jump right in! Go talk to the students who are already working for the publications and ask why they love it, what makes it worthwhile and even what makes it hard. They’ll be honest with you, and if you stick around for a staff meeting or a production night you’ll find a tight-knit, and hopefully welcoming, group that works hard and has fun. Regardless of the outlet, you will learn skills that you can use in any industry you go into after college, and will gain valuable experience and probably some hilarious stories.

Plus, you’ll find some lifelong friends. I met some of my best, most trusted friends in student media, and we still go on vacation together once a year! I just got back from Nashville with them last week.

Once you’re involved, it’s all about continuing to ask questions and use the resources at your disposal to grow. Pick the brains of older students, your advisers, students at other outlets, alumni and just about anyone on campus who you have questions for! Being in student media is like having an all-access pass to your community.

Last piece of advice: Learn more than one hard skill. If you’re interested in reporting, spend some nights on the copy desk and learn the design software your team uses. If you love shooting photos, go ahead and work with the video team, too. Like it or not, if you want to go into journalism, you are going to need to be a jack of all multimedia trades, in addition to having a solid foundation of journalistic ethics, tenacity and know-how.