Q&A with Emily Storrow, assistant editor at The Local Palate

Emily Storrow is assistant editor at The Local Palate, a culinary magazine in Charleston, South Carolina. In this interview, conducted by email, Storrow discusses her role there and her transition from newspapers to magazines.

Q. Describe your job at The Local Palate. What is your typical workday like?

A. I’m the assistant editor of The Local Palate, a magazine that covers the food culture of the South. I’m in charge of several departments in each issue. They include coverage of new restaurant openings, Southern food products and books, and seasonal cocktails. My favorite department is called “Eatymology,” in which I write about the history of a particular Southern dish (recent topics have included pickled watermelon rinds and country ham).

As for my workday – it depends! We publish 10 issues annually (one issue per month, with June/July and December/January being double issues), so my workday changes based on where we are in the life of an issue. Often it’s a combination of brainstorming content for future issues, communicating with chefs and bartenders about recipes we’re featuring, researching and requesting samples of products or review copies of upcoming book releases, meeting with other departments (often art or web) about upcoming magazine content, and of course, writing and editing copy.

Q. How do story editing and headline writing work at The Local Palate?

A. When a writer (either one of TLP’s three editors or a freelance writer) is done with a piece, we print a copy and circulate it within the editorial department. We edit it for style and grammar and often give input on headlines, word choice, etc.

Then, the editor who’s in charge of that department will review the edits and make them in the document. At that point, it’s emailed to our copy editor, who edits the document in Word with track changes on. It comes back to the editor, who reviews those changes and places the document in “final text,” which means it’s ready for the art team.

As we approach the closing of an issue, we spend between about a week editing proofs. In addition to ensuring the copy is clean, we’re finalizing things like captions and headlines, which often change based on a page’s design. (This is especially true for features; it’s difficult to settle on a headline before knowing what the final page design is.)

Q. You previously worked at the Wilkes Journal-Patriot in North Carolina. What was the transition from a newspaper to a magazine like?

A. It was a transition! I was one of four general assignment reporters in the newsroom at the J-P. We published three days a week so I was typically writing articles on an issue-by-issue basis, maybe working on a piece a week or so ahead in certain cases.

At the magazine, we work on issues that won’t hit the newsstands for months. We’re always planning content (especially features) and actively work on an issue one to two months before it comes out. For example, it’s late October, and we’re getting ready to send the December/January issue to the printer.

Another major adjustment has been getting used to the role the art department plays in the magazine’s production. In a magazine, photography and design go hand-in-hand with editorial content.

Our departments are in constant communication. When we brainstorm editorial content, we ask for the art department’s input early on so we know if the concept will work from a visual standpoint. That’s something I never had to worry about at the newspaper!

Plus, I had to start using Chicago style. (I’m still an AP loyalist at heart, though.)

Q. Working as an editor at a magazine with a focus on food sounds like a good gig. What advice do you have for journalism students aiming for a similar career path? 

A. I’d advise them to immerse themselves in whatever food scene/culture they’re interested in (for me, Southern). The food and beverage industry is a small world, and writing is a great way to establish connections. Food festivals are also great opportunities for meeting chefs and media folks.

A couple of the articles I wrote for a college feature-writing class were on people who have also appeared in Local Palate. One was the owner and namesake of Chapel Hill’s the Crunkelton, Gary Crunkleton. And he ultimately put me in touch with The Local Palate while I was job searching. Like I said, small world!