Celebrating free expression on First Amendment Day

firstamendmentday

First Amendment Day at UNC-Chapel Hill is Tuesday, Sept. 27. Here is what it’s all about:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

For journalists, that means we can gather news, write an article or blog post, edit it and put a headline on it without fear of going to prison.

There are limits — we can’t commit libel, for example, without legal consequences. And we can face criticism for what we say and write. Even so, journalists (a word that I define broadly) enjoy freedoms in this country that their counterparts in others do not.

The First Amendment’s guarantee of freedom of expression deserves a day of recognition and celebration. The events on campus this year include a reading of banned books and a discussion of “safe spaces” and “trigger warnings.” There’s even a trivia contest.

All sessions are free and open to all. I hope to see you there. You can also follow the fun on social media with the hashtag #uncfree.

ACES scholarships help students launch careers in editing

The American Copy Editors Society offers several scholarships to students interested in careers in editing.

The top award, the Aubespin scholarship, is worth $2,500. Four other scholarships are worth $1,500 each, an increase of $500 over previous years.

Marisa DiNovis won an ACES scholarship in 2015 while majoring in journalism and English literature at UNC-Chapel Hill. Here’s what DiNovis said about the scholarship and her education and the start of her career in book editing.

HOW THE SCHOLARSHIP HELPED

“As a copy editor at multiple student publications during my time at UNC-Chapel Hill, I was tremendously honored to be recognized by the American Copy Editors Society as a collegiate scholarship winner.

“I now edit books for children and teens at Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers. Although I did not go on to work in traditional journalism, the skills that allowed me to earn an ACES scholarship are an integral part of my everyday work life.

“For example, representation of diverse experiences is an initiative at my publisher, as well as in the children’s publishing industry as a whole, to create more books in which children of any marginalized or underrepresented background can see themselves. But I often have to ask myself how I, as a Caucasian woman of middle-class upbringing, can authentically edit stories by authors and about children of backgrounds different from my own.”

HER APPROACH TO EDITING

“I look to the principles I was taught as a student and copy editor: I approach every story with an eye toward accuracy, truth and fairness.

“I trust my sources — the author I’m working with is usually writing from lived experience or has researched thoroughly. I always consider the breadth of human experiences and how that plays a role in the uniqueness of storytelling. And I do everything I can to enter the story objectively and with compassion and empathy.”

HOW TO APPLY FOR A SCHOLARSHIP

ACES scholarships are open to juniors, seniors or graduate students who are interested in editing as part of their careers. You can see how to apply at the ACES site.

The deadline is Nov. 15. Winners will be honored at the ACES national conference in March 2017. Good luck to all applicants!

Studying style

stylebooks
Some of the stylebooks in the collection at the Park Library at UNC-Chapel Hill.

In addition to my usual courses this semester, I am working with a student on an independent study about stylebooks.

Alison Krug, a senior at UNC-Chapel Hill, has two objectives in mind:

  • analyzing how stylebooks come together
  • looking at how to better communicate style guidelines to journalists

By the end of the semester, Alison will revise the stylebooks for The Daily Tar Heel and Southern Neighbor. Along the way, she will interview editors at other news organizations about their stylebooks. She will also use the collection of stylebooks at the Park Library to learn about their history and evolution.

I’m looking forward to working with Alison on this project. You can follow her progress throughout the semester on her blog dedicated to the project.

Stay stylish!