Student guest post: Photoshop fails — celebrity edition

Students in J457, Advanced Editing, are writing guest posts for this blog this semester. This is the ninth of those posts. Paola Perdomo is a senior majoring in graphic design and information science. She does marketing and design work for UNC Campus Recreation, where she loves to bridge the gap between fitness and awesome visuals.

Knowing how to use Photoshop has become an extremely desirable skill in our selfie and social media-driven society. As a designer, I see Photoshop as a platform where I can always learn new tricks. I can replicate and hide and blend and alter colors to my heart’s desire, with the key always being in subtlety.

It is at this point that some of the most popular celebrities are failing, throwing subtlety to the wayside and making their photo edits obvious. Not on purpose, I hope, but obvious, nonetheless.

I can imagine that posting photos becomes an art form for popular personas like Beyoncé and Kim Kardashian. A photo on Instagram is more than a snapshot of an individual’s life. It influences millions of people that follow these accounts and potentially creates a profit for the poster. It makes sense that posting the “perfect” photo becomes the ideal, but doing so creates unrealistic standards for girls and boys of any age.

Both Beyoncé and Kardashian, who have 64.5 and 64.7 million Instagram followers, respectively, have been repeat offenders of the dreaded “Photoshop fail.” Beyoncé has been caught making her legs appear thinner on multiple occasions, and Kim Kardashian has thoroughly changed her body features: thinner arms, smaller waist, straighter nose and flawless skin. How can we tell, you ask? Every one of these photo fails have included similar telltale signs like unnatural curved spaces and unbelievable features.

Take a look at some examples below:

beyonceedit

kimedit

Why two seemingly fit and extremely successful women want to enhance (or reduce) their bodies only to release it to millions of people who will then scrutinize every inch of the image seems counterproductive. Photoshop, when used incorrectly or too much, is fairly easy to spot, which makes me believe that both Beyoncé and Kardashian edit their photos believing they will get away with it. Although no longer active, an Instagram account was created solely to expose celebrities editing their photos. When these two women have been called out on their botched edits, neither has commented.

I’ve focused on these two particular celebrities, but they are not, by far, the only ones. I would venture to predict that others will join them, including men. Just like women are plagued by images of desirable figures, men are saturated with masculinity and “ripped bods.” It seems that there is a fascination with taking things to the extreme in this increasingly exposed culture. Strong people need to become stronger, thin people need to be thinner, people who have lost weight need to lose more, and so on.

New photo-editing apps are consistently released to the public, touting their new and easy-to-use features. Filters within social media platforms are widely used and constantly updated. It all means one thing: altering and enhancing is more popular than ever and it doesn’t seem to be slowing down. So the question remains: How can we use photo editing for good?

It’s important to be aware of this development, not only to set a better example of self-confidence and self-acceptance to the general public but also to reverse the trend’s popularity. Let’s not make Photoshop the enemy here.