Q&A with Samantha Harrington of Driven Media

Samantha Harrington is co-founder and lead writer at Driven Media. In this interview, conducted by email, she discusses the site and her role in it.

Q. What is Driven Media about? What do you hope to achieve?

A. Oh, man. That’s a big question.

Driven is a media startup that, at its most basic level, aims to put more relatable women’s faces and voices in the media. We did a bunch of market research — surveys mostly — to figure out what problems people had with the media. We didn’t just want to start blindly producing content without first making sure there was a bigger need we were solving.

So many young women told us that they wanted to see more relatable stories and more positive content. So that’s what we try to produce.

I think at a larger level, we’re sort of creating this community of women who can learn and grow from each other’s stories. There are so many studies that show the impact of media consumption on self-worth and questions of identity. Sometimes it takes seeing or hearing the stories of others to realize, “Oh yeah, I can do this too. I can be who I want.” We’re all searching for something so we might as well do it together.

Q. Describe your role with the project.

A. So on the business side of things, I’m a co-owner of Driven Media, LLC. There are four owners: Hannah Doksansky, Hrisanthi Kroi, Josie Hollingsworth and me. This role means doing everything from dealing with taxes and legal documents to keeping track of receipts and expenses.

On the content side, I’m Driven’s lead writer. In a multimedia organization, that means writing everything from long-form features, blurbs for graphics, video intros, blog posts, email newsletters and more. I also do a bit of the graphic design for Driven — Hannah and I trade off on that — and some of the basic web stuff — posting, SEO, etc. Hrisanthi and Josie do the more serious web dev.

Q. How do you decide what stories to cover, and how does the reporting and editing work?

A. So we’re working on a series about immigration right now thanks to a partnership with Beacon, a crowdfunding platform for journalism. Within that, we’re really focused on telling human-focused stories of female immigrants living in the U.S. There are a lot of other themes that we’d like to work on in the future, but immigration has been a really incredible way to start out.

We’re five big stories in on the reporting front at this point, and it’s definitely my favorite part of the job. Hannah and I are doing all the reporting, and we start out by making contacts in whatever way we can. Because we’re traveling and reporting in places that we’re not experts in, the first few days are always all over the place. We’ve gotten into cities and completely changed from we thought the story was.

Take Maine for example. When we got to Portland, we thought the story was going to be focused around the Somali community there. But the more conversations we had, the more we realized that the story we needed to be telling in that moment was about asylum seekers in the state. So we try to not be too stubborn about what we think we’re going to do write off the bat.

So we start out by contacting organizations mostly — cultural associations, resettlement agencies, university groups, business associations, etc. — and then we ask who they know that would be willing to share personal stories about their lives and go from there.

This was something we had a really big issue with in West Virginia. We went in knowing that, according to the most recent census, there was a relatively large Filipino population in West Virginia, but once we got there, no one knew what we were talking about. We called countless organizations, and they all responded, “There are Filipino people here?” So we started scouring Facebook and searching Twitter and cold-contacting people that way. Surprisingly, almost everyone responded.

Once we get in touch with people, we try to spend quite a bit of time with them. We like to spend as much time just hanging out and talking to our subjects like friends as we do interviewing them.

Editing varies depending on what kind of media we’re working with. If we’re writing something, I’ll usually put it together and then email it to Josie or another friend for a look-over. With audio and video editing, it’s a lot of conversation between Hannah and me trying to figure out what looks best and makes the most sense for the story we’re telling.

That’s a really long and meandering answer, sorry. We’re still getting into our groove.

Q. You are a 2015 graduate of the journalism school at UNC-Chapel Hill. What advice do you have for those who will graduate in 2016?

A. This is hard because everyone is so different and is looking for different things.

For better or worse, I’m a live-in-the-moment kind of girl and am way too impatient to work my way up a ladder at a big organization.

I’ve always said that all I really want from a job is just to be happy in it. I don’t want to waste any time doing anything I’m not really excited about. For others, who are more patient, maybe more traditional jobs and career paths are perfect for them.

But I guess regardless of who you are and what you’re looking for, my advice is go get it. If there’s something that you want, you have to ask for it and work for it. Don’t just wait hoping that what you want might fall in your lap. Get out there and fight for it. You’ll be amazed at what you can do.

Also, a last piece of advice, more startup than personal, is just to aim to solve a problem with everything you create.

Follow Samantha Harrington and Driven Media on Twitter.