Student guest post: Newsweek’s revival — a comeback or setback for print media?

Students in JOMC 457, Advanced Editing, are writing guest posts for this blog this semester. This is the seventh of those posts. Sydney Leonard is a senior journalism major specializing in editing and graphic design with a second major in art history. She is an intern for UNC Global and at Algonquin Books.

After ceasing print publication in 2012, Newsweek is finally coming back in hard copy to a newsstand near you, expected Friday, March 7. Break out the champagne and party hats: Print media isn’t dead!

For those of us in the journalism industry, it is no secret that over the past decade, print publications have taken a major hit in advertising revenue due to our increasingly digital media landscape. Influential print publications have been forced to lay off staff and cut entire desks to cut back on costs. The New York Times had to institute a paywall on its online content.

These days, there is an ever-present conversation about the possible death of our beloved newspaper and print media. So what exactly does the Newsweek revival mean for our industry?

Looking at the root of this revival is vital to properly understanding the depth of meaning for the future of print media. After several failed attempts to keep the newsweekly magazine afloat, a small digital publishing company, IBT Media came into the picture, buying Newsweek last summer.

IBT Media believed they could resuscitate Newsweek into an animated and lucrative web-exclusive magazine. And they did just that. Tripling Newsweek’s online traffic, IBT Media now believes it can revive the hard-copy publication as well.

According to The New York Times, Newsweek plans to print 70,000 copies as opposed to the peak circulation of 3.3 million copies two decades ago, with each copy costing a reader $7.99. The print publication will be much different from the old hard copy, serving more as prop to promote online content.

IBT Media has cited shifting the culture of its content to serve a different demand and working to tailor its content to what readers want as the reasons for revival of Newsweek.

While we should celebrate the return of hard-copy of a once-failed print publication, it is imperative to realize this isn’t the same past model of American print journalism. That model is dead. The model Newsweek is aiming to operate runs a dangerous line feeding readership what they want in order to boost sales, or at least this is what it sounds to be. Only time will truly tell.

The issue we must face is that American journalism is dangling in a dangerous moment of balancing our image of the special public institution disseminating the truth to the citizens while also striving to operate as a profitable business.

Stories covering mundane or unpleasant topics are important to be covered, but nobody wants to read them. So how is the journalism industry meant to deal with this problematic equation?

Our industry needs innovative institutions that have the ability financially and culturally to bring news to the people in order for our industry to sustain itself in the future. Time will tell if IBT Media is this for Newsweek.