Student guest post: You’ve got style, BuzzFeed

Students in JOMC 457, Advanced Editing, are writing guest posts for this blog this semester. This is the third of those posts. Marisa DiNovis is a junior English and editing & graphic design major at UNC-Chapel Hill, and a native New Yorker. She is copy desk co-editor at The Daily Tar Heel and an editorial intern at Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill. A life spent reading? That’s the dream.

In my daily life, I am frequently reminded that my existence is veiled with a lens of grammatical correctness and style obsession — like last week when JOMC 457 class was canceled, and the note on the classroom door said: Today’s class is cancelled.

So this week, I’d like to take a moment to thank BuzzFeed for making public its company style guide as well as for perpetuating my “sorry, but it’s actually…” tendency.

The BuzzFeed style guide covers the company’s stylistic choices on the colloquialisms of everything from pop culture to profanity — all topics editors at The Associated Press and Chicago Manual of Style undoubtedly have opinions on, but that their professional print style guides lack.

As an editor hopeful, I can’t help but have an opinion on BuzzFeed’s guide. Here goes.

Disseminating the style guide was strategic for BuzzFeed on two counts — the content is precisely reflective of the site’s aesthetic and having shared its set of guidelines bolsters its consistency. And, for all of the skeptics on BuzzFeed’s credibility, the guide also includes more serious sections, such as the company’s corrections policy and guidelines for LGBT, transgender, abortion, immigration and rape and sexual assault terms.

For the latter, I give a round of applause. As it happens, BuzzFeed’s instructions for reporting and writing in an inclusive and unoffending way about the LGBT community and transgender issues far surpass the search results offered in the online AP Stylebook.

And not only does the AP lack a distinct section on these terms, but the print stylebook does not even list an entry for LGBT. Now in writing and editing intelligibly on LGBT issues, I wouldn’t discount deferring to BuzzFeed for the advising I might typically seek from the AP.

For the former — namely, style choices that fit BuzzFeed’s tone — my feelings vary entry to entry.

  • Auto-Tune? What am I supposed to do with that when I need it as a verb!? Sorry — ?! is what I meant to say.
  • CBGB? I had to Google it, and I still don’t know to what it refers.
  • On hyphenating ‘e’ products, BuzzFeed (and the AP, too), I stand with ‘email.’ The look of ‘e-book’ just doesn’t appeal to me.

Disclaimer: The problems I see with these style issues probably started when my parents gave me a less popular spelling of the name Marissa.

But I do digress. I’ve offered my opinion, but I don’t challenge BuzzFeed to change anything — I doubt the intention for this style guide, when it was made public, was that it be a universal set of guidelines. It’s simply how the company governs the style appropriate for its tone.

And when I — or any copy editor — need to make decisions on hippie versus hippy, whether to hyphenate supervillain, or how to discuss disembarking the “struggle bus,” it’s helpful to know BuzzFeed and the writers of its viral articles have weighed in.

So, BuzzFeed: Thanks, I (mostly) like your style.